The Safe House Project 2009 for Displaced & Homeless MSM reviewed & more

In response to numerous requests for more information on the defunct Safe House Pilot Project that was to address the growing numbers of displaced and homeless men in Kingston in 2007/8/9, a review of the relevance of the project and the possible avoidance of present issues with some of its previous residents if it were kept open. Recorded June 12, 2013; also see from the former Executive Director named in the podcast more background on the project: HERE

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

New Age Gays in Dancehall, The Shebada phenomenon


Source: The Wickedest Time


The Caribbean culture has always been known to be notoriously homophobic, but this will not stop homosexuals in the Caribbean from enjoying their life, regardless if people disapprove of their lifestyle. Now it looks like homosexuals in Jamaica has carved out a place for themselves in Kingston’s dancehall scene.



Some people are starting to call it the “Shebada Phenomenon”. And while we are on this topic, have you had a chance to see Shebada? Click on your new tab, visit youtube, and search for Shebada or Bashment Granny. Although it’s funny, I would not recommend avid homophobes to take part in it. Shebada is the name of the ‘borderline’ character in this comedic Jamaican play.
More and more gay men are now gaining confidence, celebrating their femininity, and as they grow assertive, no longer lurking in the closet for the down-low, instead they are ‘out and bad’ at your local bashment. They are often dressed in full gay regalia, freedom rings, nails, extensions and mascara. All that’s missing is the handholding and other public displays of affection.



“From wah day ya, dem out like bees, dem de a every dance, sometimes yu see a pack a dem, usually ‘bout eight or so, and dem travel in three Kingfish or three vans. And dem out de, dem have a class, dem well-dressed, in some European styles, like Jean Paul Gautier and dem spend dem money. When mi keep my dance, dem buy out di bar.” One female promoter laughed.
“Dem man ya anno fool, dem can tek care of demself and dem have connections, but dem still move careful because mi hear man and man say dem ah go kidnap two ah dem bwoy de already,” one male observed.“But to me, is like Jamaica ah get foreignized, almost like dem accept it and just look the other way, ‘cause it obvious say dem gay because dem, even when the selectors dem say ‘too much b bwoy ah come a dance from wah day ya’. It nuh jerk dem; dem just a party fi di better.”



Some people believe that the homosexual community is territorializing the dancehall space and taking their claim for acceptance within the culture.Now, it seems, even the anti-day songs are no longer a hallmark of shame for the New Age gays who see the songs as a badge of honor. “It’s really funny, when I attended college in the UK, the gays would walk out and take the centerstage when the anti-gay music played and now I am back here living in Jamaica, I see the same thing happening, when the funny man song dem start, dem walk out and say ‘whoi’ and tek centerstage,” one female public relations agent at a energy drink company said.“Mi just pap up when mi see it because dem feisty and loud and fulla drama. Mi like dem and dem like me because dem always mek me laugh and dem compliment me and tell me that I look good, and den they will say ‘girl, me a goodas too, mi like yu style’. They make me laugh,” she said.



Most Jamaicans feel differently of the matter, they are no sharing in the joke. They believe that gays are making a mockery of an art form that they struggled to bring to the world scene. Their good humor is further challenged by culture slights such as a popular youtube footage of a gay asian boy dancing to a dancehall song, an example that merely underlines the dilemma for dancehall: as more cultures are being exposed to dancehall culture, Jamaicans lose the right to tell these new recruits how to appropriate the music into their own lives.

At home, many men bite their tongue and chafe when they see beautiful and popular young women hanging out with men of questionable sexual inclinations, and that trend has spread to the poorer classes who accept these social outcasts as one of them.



“The downtown girls dem love dem, mi see dem spar wid Big Bottom Angella and she nah mek nobody do dem nothing. I guess we just have to accept them, but mi know dem still have to be careful, nuff people ah talk from wah day ya, but nothing no happen.”



I am very curious to see what becomes of this, especially since the Prime Minister recently stated that there is no room for gays in his cabinet. With this new found enthusiasm towards the undermining of the homosexual community cause more violence and hate for Jamaicans or will this be a move towards opening a new chapter and turning a new leaf in Jamaican society?

3 comments:

mark said...

Interesting... I had missed this originally.

The Wickedest Time said...

hey!!

thanks for linking in to the site :) I'm happy you enjoyed the post!

GLBTQ Jamaica Linkup Mod said...

No prob ...... a simple but profound analysis and the patois bring it real too, it was Mark (above)a reader who brough it to my attention.

It very refreshing to see a clear unbiased look at the issues without the emotional, satirical and sensational hype that comes with some articles or blog expressions sometimes.

You have a great blog as well I was going thru but time cut mi.

Peace and tolerance
H

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What to Do .....

When Arrested and taken to a Police Station you have the right to:

a. Make a phone call: to a lawyer or relative or anyone
b. Ask to see a lawyer immediately: if you don’t have the money ask for a Duty Council
c. A Duty Council is a lawyer provided by the state
d. Talk to a lawyer before you talk to the police
e. Tell your lawyer if anyone hits you and identify who did so by name and number
f. Give no explanations excuses or stories: you can make your defense later in court based on what you and your lawyer decided
g. Ask the sub officer in charge of the station to grant bail once you are charged with an offence
h. Ask to be taken before a justice of The Peace immediately if the sub officer refuses you bail
i. Demand to be brought before a Resident Magistrate and have your lawyer ask the judge for bail
j. Ask that any property taken from you be listed and sealed in your presence
Cases of Assault:An assault is an apprehension that someone is about to hit you

The following may apply:
1) Call 119 or go to the station or the police arrives depending on the severity of the injuries

2) The report must be about the incident as it happened, once the report is admitted as evidence it becomes the basis for the trial

3) Critical evidence must be gathered as to the injuries received which may include a Doctor’s report of the injuries.

4) The description must be clearly stated; describing injuries directly and identifying them clearly, show the doctor the injuries clearly upon the visit it must be able to stand up under cross examination in court.

5) Misguided evidence threatens the credibility of the witness during a trial; avoid the questioning of the witnesses credibility, the tribunal of fact must be able to rely on the witness’s word in presenting evidence

6) The court is guided by credible evidence on which it will make it’s finding of facts

7) Bolster the credibility of a case by a report from an independent disinterested party.

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